Who Wants Something PINK!

Friday, October 22, 2010

Remember the pink album created by OMC designer Lindsey that we showed you a few weeks ago?  Well to finish off our week of Breast Cancer Awareness giveaways, today we are giving away this album!  Here's a little reminder of what it looks like, just in case you don't remember.



























Lindsey left lots of space for pictures as well as for writing throughout the album.  


















There are even pockets for momentos and other small things you might want to save. It is ready for all the memories you have to be placed inside.


















Lindsey also used lots of embellishments from all different vendors on this album - we have Prima, American Crafts, Basic Grey, Jenni Bowlin, and much, much more!






























Want to know more details about this fabulous little album?  Watch our YouTube video!  Lindsey explains all about this album and what kind of products she used.





Now, on to the contest details...

For this contest we want to hear about your breast cancer story (it doesn't have to be about you personally - it can be a friend or a family member).  Leave us a comment on this post about your story.  What happened, who was involved, where you are now, etc.  

This contest will run through the weekend, and the winner of the album will be announced on Monday, Oct. 25th. 

Thanks to everyone who participated in our contests this week and for helping to promote Breast Cancer Awareness!

48 comments:

Scrappin with the bug said...

My breast cancer story is about a true survivor, My Aunt Shirley. She was in her mid 20's when 1st diag with breast cancer, she had the one breast removed. Then approx 10 years later she was diag again with breast cancer in her other breast. They removed that one as well. My aunt has endured several scopes of radition/chemo and has fought strong to be a survivor. She today is a cancer free survivor going on 15 years. Here's to all the people fighting strong against this horrible cancer.

Clare D. said...

I don't have a story, but I have six sisters. Statistically, one of us is likely to someday be diagnosed. So, I belive it is important to help where you can because someday it may be someone you love or yourself! cjdempsey9 at msn dot com

Welcome said...

I am a 10 year breast cancer survivor. I was 40 years old when I was diagnosed. I was actually annoyed that the doctor had been insistant that I get early mammograms due to my grandmother having cancer many year ago. My second mammogram showed that I had a mass and I needed to have a biopsy. I ended up having a mastectomy and chemo treatments. My family and friends were wonderful. My faith in God allowed me to never doubt that I was going to survive this bump in the road. My husband and sons learned to do laundry and cook and clean.
I am now a Relay for Life supporter. I have been on a team and a committee member of the Reynolds County Relay for Life Event every year since it started 7years ago. I have met wonderful friends and become closer to fellow co-workers and friends as they have experienced similar situations. I have lost three friends to this horrible disease and thank God for allowing me to endure. I am going to be a grandmother in January and am thankful that I will be here to love this wonderful gift from God.

Katie said...

My breast cancer story is about my mom. She was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2003. Thankfully the doctors caught it early and she was able to have it removed with a mastectomy and went through chemotherapy. She was incredibly fortunate to have caught it early enough for it to be treated and she is now 7 years cancer free!

Sharon said...

That is a very important book and is so pretty. I have had breast cancer twice. This is the most important thing i can stress to woman. I have my mammogram in May in Feb I found a lump in my monthly check. I went back to the mammogram place another test and nothing showed it was hidden by my dense breast tissue. Away request a copy of your test if is say you have dense tissue fight for a MRI. I have no cancer in my family at all I'm the first and twice at it. I will be 4 years out soon. It has been a long road. I lost my hair it came back then I was put on maintenance drugs and my hair came out again. I guess I am to wear a wig the rest of my life I have no boobs no hair but I am still here to enjoy my 3 year old grand daughter and hope my oldest daughter can having children again after loss of her twins at 5 months in May. I have a lot to live and keep fighting for. My sister was at all my treatments but for one she was sick in a year she was my team mate counting them down for me cheering me on to come on you can do it.

Vicki and Don said...

My mother-in-law passed away not from her original breast cancer, but from cancer that had spread. She was a survivor for 5 years. I was a part of her journey as she went through the masectomy, etc. She and my father-in-law wanted to have another opinion from a family member so my sister-in-law and I went with them to all of her doctor appointments, surgeries, etc. This album would be a great memory to her!

Leticia said...

My Breast Cancer Story is about my Aunt, who first suffered with a positive Cervical Cancer test in her late twenties. After receiving spiritual healing it miraculously went away. Ten years later she found out she had breast cancer. She had already been suffering from Chronic Pain and it was a big blow to handle. She always had an A cup and really struggled with where this would leave her. after having parts of both breast removed, and a round of Chemo she has no been Cancer Free for 4 years. I remember feeling so over whelmed at the time i was 28 i went and had my first Memo done, and ever since have been very diligent about doing my routine self checks.

Jamie said...

My story is about my Momma. She was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 54. She is now 56. I remember the day she told me she had breast cancer. I have never felt my heart ache so much in my life. I felt so helpless! My family and I were determined to help her get through this the best we could. We relied on the Lord, friends and a lot of prayers. We were a close family before her diagnosis, but now we are much closer. My Dad and I participated in the Breast Cancer 3 day the first year she was diagnosed. My husband and I did it last year together. As I write this today, the Breast Cancer 3 day is going on in Atlanta. Instead of doing it this year, I am taking a trip with just my Momma to the mountains. We will, in a way, be celebrating all that she has been through. She is my hero and my inspiration! She is now cancer free and enjoying life to the fullest. My family and I are doing all we can to MAKE PINK JUST ANOTHER COLOR!!!

Anonymous said...

Hi My name is Gayle. At the age of 41, what was first thought to be a cyst turned out to be Stage II Breast Cancer.
Losing my left breast and undergoing chemo was difficult. Cancer was most certainly a dragon; and I became a dragon slayer determined to live to see my young daughters grow up. Nearly twenty years later, with the help and support of my husband, family and friends, I’m cancer free.

Our daughters are 27 and 29 years old, out of college and busy with their careers these days. I don’t have any special words of inspiration but each woman can find the inner strength to survive. Grab your trusty sword and slay the cancer dragon!

P.S. Humor always helps too. Here’s a funny story. While I was undergoing treatments I wore a wig because most of my hair had fallen out. One afternoon just before I raced to the bus stop, I reached inside the oven to pull out a pan of brownies I baked for the children. I was out the door in a flash, not realizing the effect the heat of the oven had on my hair do.

Perhaps not wanting to hurt my feelings, none of the moms at the bus stop mentioned a word. Scampering off the bus, my daughters immediately pointed to my wig. "Mommy, What happened?" they giggled. It wasn’t until we walked home and I stood before a mirror that I understood what was so funny. The synthetic hair in my wig frizzed wildly in some spots and completely melted in other areas. Talk about Bad Hair Days! This too, I survived.
Gayle Geisenheimer
hgeisenheimer@hvc.rr.com

Kerstin said...

Meine Mutter ist vor 20 Jahren an Brustkrebs erkrankt, ihr wurde die linke Brust abgenommen.Sie wurde geheilt. Gott sei Dank, kam der Krebs bis heute nicht wieder. Ich gehe seit dem auch jedes Jahr zur Vorsorgeuntersuchung.

TCB~ELVIS said...

My story is about my Grandma! She fought Breast Cancer for 13 years. She was always very confident in the Lord that he had a direction for her. Many times she would be Cancer free only to have it show its ugly face in a different part of her body. We were not close when I was young but as I got older and she got sicker we began to talk about life and what she had endured in her many years. She taught me a lot and even when she was dying she stayed positive and kept her laughter and joking around. All of the family were around her as she took her final breaths and she was so excited to g "Home" to be with our Father. I get checked regularly and I am 31 now with a child of my own that I wish she could have seen. She fought the good fight and I miss her dearly but I know she is waiting for us to arrive. I will forever help contribute to Breast Cancer Awareness in hopes to find a cure someday and also will continue to help families who have been stricken with this terrible Cancer! Much Love~

creative patti said...

My story is about my Aunt. about two years agao she was diagnoises with Breat cancer, Cancer has always ran very strong in my family and we have all been touched by some kind of cancer. My Aunt is a survivor and is doing well now, although she had to have both brest removed she is cancer free now. I pray everyday for a cure to this awful thing, and I thank God for my aunt everyday. Thank you for letting me share t h is with you. pattig161@yahoo.com

Steffany said...

My mom in law was first diagnosed with Breast Cancer back in 1997. It was a battle for a few years and she won. Not too long after she was diagnosed with skin cancer, thankfully she won that battle as well. 3 years ago, the doctors discovered that she has first signs of colon cancer - but it was dectected on time! And she was once again a survivor. This year, while I was pregnant [with her first grandDAUGHTER] the dotors told her that her breast cancer had come back and they had to amputate the one breast she had left in order to save it from spreading. So they did. This was a couple of months ago and she is just starting to feel better. She has had 13 surgeries in the last 8 years. She is truely a survivor, she has been Blessed many times with miracles of God.

Steffany
scrappinit[at]hotmail[dot]com

Debbie Yates said...

I have a trues story of Breast Cancer - it is not me but my "baby" sister, Donna. She was diagnosed in September 2003, surgery in October,and cancer free seven years later. She is the strongest person I know and a true Survivor.

imechard said...

My mom was diagnosed with breastcancer six years ago, I had just found out I was pregnant with my first child. It was such a small lump that she missed it on her sself exam and the dr missed it on the clinical exam as well. Even with the picture of the mammogram he could not find it. Soon after it was removed and it had already grown. Now six years later, five grandchildren later, she has been given the all clear. And she gets to enjoy her family a little while longer. Besides other benefits, it is one of the reasons for me to breastfeed my children and reduce my risk

debannet said...

My story is about my Mom. At 40 they found a lump in her left breast. That lump lead to a radical mastectomy of the left breast and lymph nodes being removed. They left no tissue only a bare film of skin covering her ribs. With 2 boys (aged 12 and 14) and having just emigrated from England she faced chemo and radiation therapy while my Dad worked to support everyone. They had little medial coverage. After completing her radiation, my Mum wasn't feeling well and back to the Dr's. she went. That's when they told her at 41 she was pregnant! This was 48 years ago and at that time they recommended that she abort the pregnancy. My parents believed the pregnancy was God's will and put faith in him that all would be well. I am glad to say she decided against aborting and when my Mum was 42 I was born. My Mum lived a long life and survived her cancer for another 45 years.

Darline W. said...

I just read all the stories here & they were all very touching & they all hit home with me. At the age of 37, otherwise healthy, my life took a detour down the breast cancer road. In November 2005, and by the grace of God, I found a lump by sheer accident or so I thought. I totally forgot about it & felt it again 2 weeks later. I made an appt with my FP who reassured me at my age, location of the lump, etc...that it was probably just a cyst. BUT, my doctor wanted to be 100% sure so she sent me for a mammo & ultrasound. I received a phone call from my dr who told me that the ultrasound showed a lump & 2 spots. I, then went to a gen'l surgeon who performed a needle biopsy (ouch!!) waited through Christmas for the results & the day after New Year's was told that I had 2 separate types of breast cancer which seemed to be very aggressive... Let me stop here. My hubby had been with me to every appt up until this one. It was ME & my Gen'l Surgeon...face to face. I can't tell you how at peace I was when he informed me that I had breast cancer!! No, I didn't break down & cry... I asked him, "Okay, what are you going to do about it?" From there, he performed a right side mastectomy & my plastic surgeon performed a right side tissue expander (beginning of reconstruction...) - 2 weeks later, I was brought in for both of my surgeons to do a "little" more surgery b/c the radiologist required it due to margins. 7 out of 10 lymph nodes were positive so Chemo was ordered. To make a very long story shot, I had the 2 initial surgeries, 16 weeks of chemo, 1 reconstruction fix (tissues expander flipped upside down!!), 35 rounds of radiation. I am celebrating my 42nd birthday as well as 5 years of being a survivor this month!! By the grace of God, I am still here and HE healed me! My youngest child at the time was 4 and my oldest was 10. With no family in the area, my Church family & friends came to our aide. Since then, a year after my diagnosis, I had genetic testing done & found out I was carrying the breast cancer gene. That means, within 5 years, I would develop breast cancer in my left breast, develop uterine, ovarian or cervical cancer. We made the decision to be pro-active & have a left breast mastectomy & a full hysterectomy. I am now going through menopause. Even though, the hot flashes stink & I can't have hormone replacement therapy for the estrogen, I smile each day because I am still HERE! I would never wish my journey on anyone BUT, for me...it was a life changing experience and one I am grateful for. I am able to talk to other women who are going through the walk...and, I hope that I am able to give them hope, encouragement & the will to fight for their lives <3 THANK YOU for allowing me to share my story!! <3

Marsha@kandidkeepsakes said...

My Nana was diagnosed with breast cancer and ended up having to have a mastectomy and she lived in a great deal of pain and shame from loosing her breast. This was nearly 20 years ago and at the time, this was not quite so celebrated. She lived with the physical and emotional scars everyday. I have made it my personal mission, since her death, that I will not let another wonderful woman feel ashamed because her body has changed. Our boobs serve a function, they are not how I choose to define myself as a woman! I have faced many medical issues myself and I know all too well that your body may not always be there when you need it! Thanks Nana for the wonderful woman you have made me!

BethanyR said...

I already won a prize this week so I don't wnat to be considered for this but I wanted to share my story. I have a Sister-in-law, that is really like a siter to me as her and my brother started dating when they were 15, when she was 36 with a 4 year old daughter she was diagnosed with an agressive form of breast cancer. To beat it the docotrs suggested an agressive chemo treatment, stem cell transplant and radiation. Before her hair started to fall out she had told me that she was not going to deal with it falling out and when it did would I come over and shave her head for her. I said yes. When the time came and she called me I hung up and called my mom and told her I can't do this, she said suck it up and yes you can I'll meet you over there. While I stood behind her and shaved her head the tears rolled down my cheeks, to lighten the mood she asked me to give her a mohawk first since it would be the only time in her life she would have one. We did that, took pictures and laughed. It was a long summer as she went through treatments but we rallied around her and her family and we made it out on the other side, all of us closer and a whole lot more thankful for our health, our family, and God's healing. That was in 2001 and she has been cancer free ever since.

Brenda said...

I have my yearly mamogram in October because its Breat Cancer Awareness month and also my birthday month. Just an easy reminder to do it then. Last year we found a lump. I was devastated. Luckily it wasn't cancer, but since it runs in my family, its always a little scary and I am scheduled now to go twice a year. April was my first 6 month appt and all was good. Next Tuesday is my yearly appt., keeping my fingers crossed for still being good.

Burffrau @ aol dot com

Dena Coper Kimbrel said...

My mother is a breast cancer survivor and a American Cancer Volenteer and Board Member. My mother was diag with breast cancer 9 years ago she fought to be here to see her grandchildren grow-up and some day get married. She serves as a volenteer at the local cancer center to help other cancer patients deal with there treatment and to help in any way that she can. I am proud that she is my mother and I know that she is also helping the ACS try and find away to beat all cancers.

Michelle D said...

I was just 35 yrs old when a my doc found a lump he didnt like. I needed a mammogram - no biggie, right? I didn't want to worry my darling Husband, so I scheduled it for when he was out of town on training. 10 minutes into the exam, they told me I needed an ultrasound, but they didn't have an opening for 2 hours and I should wait. Without question, it was longest 2 hours of my life. They finally declared me clear, but I will NEVER GO THROUGH THAT ALONE AGAIN!!!! My Mom (who lives far away) just had an experience that was similar (test after test)and I insisted she have someone with her! She was also declared clear just a few days ago.

Reading the previous entries has been inspiring. Thank you ALL for sharing.

Carol said...

Two friends have made me have a greater understanding of this terrible disease. One because she is a survivor and the other because of the impact of losing her mom. From this awareness, I was God-ready when I had a suspect Mammogram. As anyone who has had a suspect read, you are really apprehensive, okay scared. So much goes through your mind, but that isn't why I was there that day. this was a Military Tricare facility and the area was under construction. There were two of us sitting in the hallway with our gowns basically opened but tied to the front. We arrived about the same time, and we each went in separately for our retest. When I came out, she was there. She was still in getting her retest. Me, I was still in the gown (not feeling too comfortable) when she came back out. Because we had something in common, I said Hi, and we chatted. This lady, whose name I do not remember, shared that she had had a bad mammogram on one of her breasts previously and she was there that day because there was a spot showing on her other breast. Well, over the past several years, God has taken a lot of things out of my life. I have fibromyalgia and can't work any more. I am a 90% disabled vet but unemployable. I lost my part-time job because I was so unreliable. I can't walk around the block without fear of blacking out. Anyway, from these losses, God made me focus on the here and now. I would be sent (like to CKU Masters in Anaheim) to meet a lady sitting in a hallway. I had the compassionate face and some really important info she needed to hear (I came from Hawaii and was so sick after talking with this lady I missed my CKU -- btw a Pastor Convention was down the same hallway).
Anyway, that day in Tripler, I could totally understand where this lady was coming from. We were both frightened. We had to wait on the doctor. So we chatted and I listened. I got called and went to see the doc. I didn't even stop to think to ask some really important questions, I was so relieved when he told me my mammogram was good and would retest the next year. I came down the hallway to check out,and I decided I wanted to leave a feedback because of the care and love I felt demonstrated by the mammographer. That took some time because of the construction. When I turned around, there was the lady in the hallway. I walked up to here and hugged her. God gave me some words to let her know that he loved her and that his arms were around her and He was there with her. I prayed right in this military hospital. when I finished,I turned around and that is when I noticed another lady and a small child. They were this ladies daughter and grandchild. God gave me this opportunity to be there, to sit with lady, to connect to her and to share her scares and fears. I couldn't say everything would be okay. I wish I could,butI knew to tell her that God loved her and that He had his arms wrapped around her. Thanks to my two friends, I was more aware of this disease and God had prepared me. I continue now to look for God's opportunities when I face some 'scary' things. Sometimes God wants you to stand with your gown opening to the front in a predominatly male arena as Tripler is so that He can speak to one He loves. God said that day that He loved this lady as He loves other women and men who have breast cancer.

Sandy A said...

I had a scare! I have Ankolosing Spondilitis, its an auto immune disease that has been a very hard thing to go through in its self! I was given all kinds of meds. to help the disease, but the side affects range from small things to some pretty bad side affects! So when I was doing a self test I found a lump. This was not something that I didn't want to add to my list of health issues! So I went in to my OBYN and they ordered a mammogram, and then and ultra sound. The lump was what they think a swollen lymph node, but the doctors are keeping a close watch on it because it is in my lymph node. I have to get tested every six months. My prayer is that it doesn't move into becoming cancer! I am lucky that I dodged a bullet for now, I have so many other health issues that I wouldn't want to add cancer to my list! Breast Cancer is something that was thought to be for an older person, but I have seen any age at anytime it can affect you! I am 36 its been a year since this scare started. My hope is that we can teach our teens to start doing self checks, so that early detection can save more people and keep brest cancer at bay!

K Led said...

Mine is about my wonderful Grandma. She had breast cancer is only one breast, I was about 20 when this happened, I remember my mom being so scared and was wondering myself if I would loose my grandmother or not. She ended up fighting it and getting rid of the cancer but had to loose her one breast to do that. I remember her being very sad that she had to go through that. I knew God was watching over her though and he would get her through it. She survived and it never came back. Sadly a few years down the road we lost her to a stroke, I miss my grandmother so much and even though I am only 31 I am going to start getting mammograms early to detect anything I can. I have walked Susan G. Komen fundraisers and have and continue to give money to the foundation in hopes that someday we can find a cure.

Anonymous said...

My mom found out she had breast cancer in August. Her sister and then her best friend had died of breast cancer earlier in her life so it was a scary time. She had to have a masectomy and was doing radiation when my sister Fran found out she had breast cancer. It has been a journey for them both. They are now both finished with their treatments and hoping to be cancer free forever.

Ashleigh said...

WOW! That is an amazing album! But I do not have a breast cancer story but to hopefully end breast cancer and prevent me from getting it my husband and my mom are do the 60mile walk in November. I am helping with their fund raising efforts. Good luck to all!

aecopenhaver at gmail dot com

Chris Wooten said...

I am being watched every 6 months to make sure there are no new changes. I do not have breast cancer, but have clusters of calcium which can turn into the disease. I am just praying each time I go back that the clusters are not more.

Thanks for all you do for us who are at risk and or have fought the fight.

chris
mcwooten1999@carolina.rr.com

Scrappy Jackie said...

That album is beautiful. If I won this album... I would make up an album to honor my aunt Lauri who passed away from an amazing and hard fought battle with breast cancer almost 9 years ago. I would then give it to my mom! She was an awesome independent woman. Her courage was an inspiration. My mom was her care giver at Karmenos hospital in Detroit when she had a bone marrow transplant. There is so much I have learned from her... I cannot even begin to tell everything about her. What a blessing she was in my life... Honoring her is my pleaure...even if I do not win the album... I need to make something pretty and pink up!

smokiegeyer said...

Every year I participate in the Walk Against Breast Cancer. I hope a cure can be found in the near future so no one has to suffer from this again.

debpaint16 said...

I am a 6 year breast cancer survivor. I found a lump, out of the blue when I was 47. I never had a base-line mammmogram at age 40 because I had no health insurance, and we had no family history, and I, like alot of us, figure it'll never happen to me....but it did!
I was blessed to find an organization called Breast & Cervical Cancer Prevention, who covered my mammogram, ultrasound & biopsy. I chose to have a double-mammogram brcause I wanted to only go through the surgery thing one time, & to not have to worry about the other breast.
I elected to have reconstruction right away, which I regret to this day. I got a staph infection after my mastectomy, so they had to go in again, they took out the spacers, and this happened 3 more times for a total of 10 surgeries in 4 1/2 years, and I still don't have an implant on the cancer side, as my body kept rejecting it. The bottom line is I had a scare 2 years ago, but it turned out benign. I am happy to still be cancer free after 6 + years. The help & support of my son, my sister & my best friend got me through the whole ordeal, I could not have done it without them, I am truely blessed!!!

debpaint16@aol.com

Terry said...

My sister Mary Kay- the oldest girl in a family of 10 kids - was a 5 year breast cancer survivor. She never really considered herself a "survivor" because although she had a mastectomy she didn't have to go through chemo or radiation for the breast cancer. She was very humble about being called a survivor. Just before my sister was at her 4 year anniversary of her masectomy she became very ill. It turned out she had liver and bile duct cancer. This type of cancer has a very low survival rate. Mary Kay fought hard for 18 months going through radiation and chemo. She participated in trial drugs trying to beat this cancer. We were having a family reunion in July of 2009 and Mary Kay was a big help in planning and getting everything together for it. She was admitted to the hospital a week before she was leaving to go to the reunion. The Dr told her they were taking her off all medications and told them to call Hospice. Mary Kay told her Dr she was going to the reunion "come hell or high water!" She made the 10 hour trip on Monday night and ended up in the hospital on Wednesday afternoon. She never left that hospital. When she left for the reunion her husband told her she could go home early if she wanted - she insisted that she was staying until Sunday. Mary Kay lost total consciousness on Friday night and held on until Sunday morning. THis was very special because all of Mary Kay's brothers and sisters and nieces and nephews were able to see her. She was the biggest fighter I have ever known and I looked up to her my whole life. Next week her 2 daughters and my 2 daughters and I will be walking in the Susan G Komen 3 Day Breast Cancer walk. http://www.the3day.org/site/TR/2010/TampaBayEvent2010?px=1099134&pg=personal&fr_id=1472

MingK said...

My story is about my sister-in-law, Fannie. We lost her to cancer in January 2004. She was married to my brother, who was the oldest. Even though I have three older sisters, I was extremely close to my Fannie. I was 14 when she married my brother. She had a huge part in raising me. She was always knew when I needed her through all the growing pains. She was diagnose with Ovarian cancer, then it spread to liver, colon and breast. She would beat one, then another came on and in the end it was all over her body. She was so strong and raised two wonderful boys while fighting this battle. It wasn't til her youngest son graduated from college did her fight end. She was determined to see him through. We miss her each and every day and know that she is watching over us from above. I love and miss her every day but I know she taking care of my mom, who we lost to colon cancer in 2008. Two very beautiful women in heaven watching over us.

Carrie K said...

My aunt was diagnosed with breast cancer 3 years ago. She had a double mastectomy and reconstructive surgery. She is now cancer free and at 62 has perky new boobs!
She came through it all like a trooper. Never heard her complain or whine about pain. I have never seen such a strong woman!

Kelly Massman said...

I'm fortunate that no one in my immediate family had breast cancer. But, my great aunt Tillie had it and ultimately lost her battle with it. I just remember her being so tired all of the time. I think things have come along way since then, but more research should be done. And, there is no reason for any age-appropriate woman to skip her mammogram.
That is one gorgeous album! Thanks for a chance to win it!

Michelle said...

Not all breast cancers have lumps.

At 25 years old I started having bloody discharge from my nipple. It was not caused by any infection. I had mammograms and dye injected into the mammary ducts then x-rays. The radiologist thought she saw something which she thought was cancer of the mammory duct, the oncologist disagreed so I was In limbo with 2 opposing doctors and didn't know what to do.

The radiologist wanted breasts removed right away, biopsy wasn't given as an option. The dr didn't recommend any action but said she would remove them just in case.

I decided not to have surgery and did some research and found it was hormonal.

It was very frightening at the time, especially with 2 opposing doctors.

Get second and third opinions or more if you need to and also listen to your instincts.


Michelle Hotchkiss

Denise said...

Hi I would like to enter the competiton.
My story is about a friend of mine who has had breast cancer.
Her story is this, a woman who worked in her office had breast cancer and told everyone in her office to go & have a mamorgram which my friend did. The mamogram found that she had a lumb in her chest and she had to have it removed, the radio and chemo treatment after that. all through this she stayed positive and she is now again healthy back at our gym and is a shining example to everyone that she knows. Her daughters are hosting a girls night in for october cancer month for their mum and we are all going. I would love to win this to give to her so she can journal her journey through this terrible disease and out the other side.

grannyfunk said...

This is about my friend Rose. She died of Breast cancer the 8th of August. She had won the battle of breast cancer and then it spread to other places in her body but she was a true hero! She fought so hard! I really got to know her about 4 years ago. She and my friend Vickie and I took a road trip to St Louis, Mo for a CKC convention. It was a first for all of us. We had so much fun! When we arrived home, her daughter was waiting for us; she would not let us begin to unload because she had to take pictures of our car. It was loaded to the top of the car and just enough room for one of us to sit in the back. We had bought so much stuff it was unbelievable. Rose continued to scrapbook with us until about 9 months ago. Her daughter was such an inspiration to us and to her mother. Dana has started a foundation in honor of her mother. It is called “Fight like Rose” because Rose truly fought a good fight! Dana started this foundation because as her mother would go to chemo, the oncology ward at our hospital had recliners in which the foot rest would not stay up, Dana would sit there with her knees under so her mother could relax as much as she could. The money she (Her organization) earns will go towards new recliners. Each recliner cost $900 plus, she would like to replace all of them. Her goal is to do our hospital, then find another, then another, the another.
At the funeral home Dana had every scrapbook Rose had done of their families. She framed some pages, it was so beautiful. I knew when I look at Rose, which she was in heaven rejoicing that she had no more pain, she was so beautiful and looked so peaceful!
Rose my friend I will see you in Heaven one of these days! I miss you but know you are so much better off!

tina said...

My grandma was diagnosed with breast cancer a few years ago; my how time flies, it seems like just last month. She made it through chemo and radiation treatments, travelling over an hour each way daily to do so. She was so very weak, tired and pale, not to mention bald. It was very hard to see my grandma like that. She contracted shingles several weeks before she was scheduled to be done with the daily radiation treatments. Not even a year later, she had a second open-heart surgery. She's never been the same since. She survived! She's just a little less energetic, but she still the grandma that I love. Her sister died not to long ago from cancer. They were best friends. My grandpa had a very strong love/hate relationship with his sister-in-law. :-) I've never seen my grandpa cry, but I know he had to shed a tear or two during all the run-ins his family has seen with cancer. It's such an ugly word; just a devistating disease. I have cousin who is 33 years old dealing with cancer as I type. She's been seeking treatments at University of Washington medical center with her devoted sister and mother by her side. I love the color Pink and I wear it proudly often (almost daily during october), but so many other cancers are out there as well. People all around us are suffering. I am grateful my grandma survived breast cancer. I am praying my cousin is comforted through her trials of cancer. Although there is a lot of money making gimicks out there, please know that any money towards research of this awful disease has got to help fight it.

LaMaMaLa said...

Breast cancer runs in my husbands family. He's had an aunt die from it, and two other aunts get a breast removed. My family doesn't have any history like this, so it's pretty scary to think about. If i got this album, I would dedicate it to those women and I would teach my daughters about breast cancer.

scrappydappydoodler said...

30 years ago my grandmother passed away from cancer. She had acute myelocytic leukemia and breast cancer. No one knew that she was sick until the end. She was either in denial or just didn't want anyone to know. We were living in Germany at the time and moved back to the states to be with her. Unfortunately she passed as soon as we got back. I think you should let someone know. Don't go through it alone. I hope I am never diagnosed with cancer but if I am I hope to draw strength from all my friends and family. Women are strong and we are fighters. Let's kick cancer's butt!

Melinda AKA medialady said...

I don't have a story personally but I do have a friend that drives a school bus with me that recently had breast cancer. She was such a trooper during all of her treatment and finished the last one just this week. My prayers are with her that she will be free from all of this for the rest of her life.

Dianne said...

I have a breast cancer story about a friend of 42 years who was an inspiration to all of our Thursday night supper group, The Golden Girls. It was two years ago when she got the news and told us at dinner that following Thursday. We were crushed, but not her. She already knew how she was going to fight this and although she had some apprehension of the outcome, she knew she would not let it make her depressed or fearful. She had the breast removed. She was so sick at times during the chemo. She lost her hair and wore the most stylish wig. At work she would sometimes pull the wig off and set it on her desk, which was funny to her employees. That's the way she is, always looking for a way to the lighter side and not being sad. She wore the most interesting knitted hats when she went out with the "girls" and always had something uplifting to say to us. She is my hero and I would hope that I would be able to face my giants the way Vivian has. Today she is two years away from that day her world went dim, and is back to working, traveling, and living the life she fought to preserve.

Vickie said...

My breast cancer story is about my Mom or should I say my Angel??? She battled Breast cancer twice the first time she won but the second time the cancer won and was cancer free for 7 years. Next month will be the 5th anniversary of her death. I miss her a lot but I know that I will see her again in heaven. She is my special angel. She would want every one reading not to be sad but to get your mammograms!!!!

deb_williams6@yahoo.ca said...

My good friend survived breast cancer and as a precaution had a double mastectomy performed. She underwent reconstructive surgery after a couple of years. She lived 10 years cancer free--but unfortunately God had other plans for her. She was diagnosed later with bone cancer and succumbed to this horrid, painful disease 6 months later. We miss you Linda and love you.

Joan V said...

About 14 yrs ago, my Grandmother was diagnosed with breast cancer. She chose not to have any chemo after the 3rd treatment. It saddens me that she made this decision. She was a pretty healthy 84 yr old before this diagnosis. She survived for 2 yrs after her initial diagnosis. My mom told me that Gram didn't want to be a burden to anyone. I loved my Gram and miss her and wish she had made a different decision. I love you, Gram. Here is to all you Grandmothers, keep fighting because your grandchildren need you for that special Grandmother loving. joanvanc@gmail.com

ScrapbookingRN said...

10 years ago my ex-friends mother was having a breast removed due to breast cancer. When she had surgery, she personally asked that I be there for her surgery and her recovery. I stayed with her during the procedure and for 5 days afterwards. She had the best spirit and was always encouraging. I was honored that she had asked me to be by her side. She thought of me as a daughter. I kept in contact with her after my ex and I broke up for about 2 years. She always thanked me for being there.

Heather said...

I became very passionate about walking in the Race for the Cure and breast cancer awareness about 11 years ago when a dear college friend was diagnosed with breast cancer. At the tender age of 30 it was quite a shock to all of us. And when she chose an elective double masectomy, it was even more of a shock. But I could appreciate the decision. Since then, two other ladies in my life have become survivors and beaten breast cancer. I get so emotional when watching the survivors pink parade at the Race for the Cure each year and seeing the thousands of people walking for a cause for which I'm so passionate! And it's made me more aware of doing self-exams and making sure my friends (now that we're in our 40s) are all getting annual mammograms! I pray for a cure by the time my daughter reaches my age!!

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